Ecoregions | WWF

Ecoregions

Due to long isolation from major landmasses, and the influence of geography and climate, the biodiversity of Madagascar is extremely rich and diverse across relatively small areas. The island-continent has evolved remarkably diverse ecosystems including lush tropical rain forests, mountain peaks, tropical dry forests, near-desert environments, mangrove forests, and coral reefs - each supporting a stunning array of unique species.
It is estimated that 85% of the island’s 12,000 species of flowering plants are found nowhere else in the world. This unique biodiversity has led to the recognition of Madagascar as a "living laboratory" and the "seventh continent".

This Global ecoregion is made up of these terrestrial ecoregions: Madagascar subhumid forests, Madagascar ecroid thickets, and Madagascar lowland forests.

The Madagascar Subhumid Forests are scattered in several "islands" of montane humid forest throughout the central highlands of Madagascar. The lowland forests of Madagascar include a narrow strip of humid forests along the east coast, low elevation forests.

The Madagascar ericoid thickets are 4 large mountainous formations, called massifs that rise in scattered points from the island of Madagascar. The name of the ecoregion is based on its principal species of vegetation - thicket-forming plants of the Ericaceae (blueberry) family.
WWF MWIOPO Project Sites 
	© WWF Madagascar
WWF MWIOPO Project Sites
© WWF Madagascar